Winning Marketing Concepts Made Easy!

There’s nothing more vital to having a successful winning product that will improve your bottom line than having a winning marketing concept. All too often, products that have been promoted and hyped as being the “next big thing” have fallen on their faces because of having a poor marketing concepts. An example the author mentions of a product that got the ide If you are interested in improving your product’s image and increasing your sales, you owe it to yourselves to get, read, and study Martha Guidry’s latest book, Marketing Concepts That Win! One of the best aspects about Marketing Concepts That Win is that Guidry provides excellent examples and case studies throughout her book, and she offers tips, tools, and useful advice to help her readers refine the concept they’ve come up with so that potential consumers identify with the product more. For instance, Chapter 8, “Reason To Believe,” gets into the importance of the reason to believe, or RTB, to a product’s promise to the consumer.

RTBs are often built up over time, and it’s basically a combination of the branding of a product and its motto or other aspects of a company that have stood the test of time and which the public associates the company/product with. RTBs make the public look more favorably towards a new product companies come up with based on a belief system about the company’s track record and branding over the years. What the author terms “brand equity” plays a substantial part in this development of RTBs, as with Smucker’s slogan “With a name like Smucker’s, it has to be good,” or Apple’s image among consumers as being “hip, cool, easy-to-use,” and having “innovative approaches to technology.”

Chapter 4 goes into what the five basic elements are that comprise a concept: a headline, an ACB (accepted consumer belief), it’s benefit to the consumer, the RTB, and an effective wrap-up. It’s a very useful and informative chapter that analyzes what elements make the difference between a good concept and mediocre ones. With Martha Guidry’s guidance, you can learn how to formulate the concepts to sell your products to the widest audience possible.

What are some of the other topics that the book covers? The author takes her readers from the beginning stages she discusses in Chapter 1: Concept Development, to formulating an outline of a concept, to what she calls in Chapter 5 “CleAR,” thinking being the way to come up with the best concepts. The letters refer to “the intersection of three critical areas: content, language, and relevance.” Guidry goes into the importance of each off these three concept elements and how, when they’re effectively combined, they make the overall concept a stronger one that resonates more with consumers.

Marketing Concepts That Win! combines the knowledge of more than fifteen years’ worth of experience that the author has had in brand management, concept development, and research experience. Martha Guidry has walked the walk, having spent six years in consumer marketing for Procter & Gamble and Hasbro. She’s developed concepts to help launch new products for companies such as Arby’s, DuPont, Bush’s Beans, Amway, Pizza Hut, and Dial. If you are interested in marketing and branding your product more effectively, and want to develop a powerful concept to sell it, I urge you to check out Martha Guidry’s fascinating book today!There’s nothing more vital to having a successful winning product that will improve your bottom line than having a winning marketing concept. All too often, products that have been promoted and hyped as being the “next big thing” have fallen on their faces because of having a poor marketing concept. An example the author mentions of a product that got the idea of having a good marketing concept right is McDonald’s McCafe, that has successfully competed against brands such as Starbuck’s. If you are interested in improving your product’s image and increasing your sales, you owe it to yourselves to get, read, and study Martha Guidry’s latest book, Marketing Concepts That Win! One of the best aspects about Marketing Concepts That Win is that Guidry provides excellent examples and case studies throughout her book, and she offers tips, tools, and useful advice to help her readers refine the concept they’ve come up with so that potential consumers identify with the product more. For instance, Chapter 8, “Reason To Believe,” gets into the importance of the reason to believe, or RTB, to a product’s promise to the consumer.

The Behavioral Marketing Concept Has Revolutionized Online Advertising

In today’s modern world where more and more people are conducting businesses online, the marketing strategies have become crucial to have an edge in the competitive world of online advertising. In a scenario where many similar websites are vying for the attention of limited consumers, it would make business sense for a marketer or advertiser to identify the core group of consumers who are genuinely interested in his products and services. This enables the advertiser to prevent the tremendous wastage of efforts and resources which are incurred while randomly targeting all online visitors irrespective of their needs and interest in the product or service offered by the advertiser’s website. The Behavioral Marketing Concept has managed to bring this advantage of identifying the actual potential consumer within the smart advertiser’s grasp.

The Behavioral Marketing Concept focuses on consumers on the basis of their behaviors on Internet sites, rather than strictly by page contents. Clients who subscribe to the Behavioral Marketing Concept target other clients by aiming advertisements to categories or predefined segments. The advertisements and communication messages are created with information compiled from IP details and click stream data. An Internet user visits various interest pages in a category on a specific website. The user is then targeted by the specially created advertisements via a ROS (run-of-site) placement. Under the Behavioral Marketing Concept, the placement is not the key, but the Internet user’s behavior.

Advertisers and online publishers use the Behavioral Marketing Concept to boost the usefulness of various campaigns. The concept is to examine a consumer’s Internet behavior unobserved and then provide the most significant advertisement based on conduct. Theoretically, Behavioral Marketing Concept aids different advertisers in conveying the advertisement specifically to online users who are probably influenced and interested in the product and service on offer. Tacoda & Revenue Science are two leaders in the markets of Unites States of America, which focus strictly on assisting advertisers and publishers to implement Behavioral Marketing Concept.

Moreover, the big advertisement networks (Microsoft, ValueClick, Advertising.com and BlueLithium) have actually added the implementation of the behavioral marketing concept to their services and are able to incorporate it with demographic and geographic targeting. Google claims it will strictly target the marketing of advertisements based on the details of the particular page where the advertisement is displayed. This particular aspect of the behavioral marketing concept is referred to as Contextual Marketing.

Applying the behavioral marketing concept, in the latter half of 2002, Yahoo initiated its initial version of Behavioral Marketing. The product which also supported European and Asian scoring for visitors was known as “Fusion”. In the year 2003, Yahoo started a redesign initiative for its behavioral marketing profiling technology, known as Behavioral Targeting 2.0. Assorted improvements in visitor scoring, automated categorization, inventory predictions and enhanced reporting were all rolled out over the last several years. When it comes to privacy issues, a number of advocacy groups and online users are strongly concerned around this sort of behavioral marketing. However the advantages offered to advertisers and users will ensure that the concept is around for a long time to come.

Reach More Customers With Direct Marketing

Direct marketing, including direct mail, telemarketing and email marketing, is the most traditional and cost effective form of advertising. While television and radio advertisements have the ability to bring in a lot of business, they are expensive and cannot target an ultra-specific audience. Direct marketing, however, has the ability to focus on a specific group of people and present them messages tailored distinctively for them.

Direct marketing encompasses the traditional method of direct mail, as well as telemarketing. Email marketing is also a very low cost method of advertising that is sent to consumers directly. In an effort to cut down on waste and build a customer base, direct marketing requires a significant amount of research. Defining your target audience will help you streamline your message and send materials directly to those folks, instead of blanketing a region with the same, generic message. This research is an ongoing process, and should be constantly tweaked as a result of the response you receive.

The goal of direct marketing is simple: Turn people into customers through a series of advertisements that peak their interest. Peaking their interest can be a challenging task. Direct mail can be seen as “junk mail” and thrown out before it is even fully read. How often have you received “junk mail” and thrown it out before reading it? Think about what it would take for a piece of direct mail to grab your attention and cause you to read it. Put those characteristics into your direct mail. In order to grab the attention of a perspective customer, you must make your direct mail stand out. Use a simplistic, yet eye-catching, design and copy that is compelling and inspires the reader to take action.

It is easy to send out a mass email or mass direct mail campaign that encompasses a wide area of people with a picture of your product and it’s price. However, this is not the most effective way of direct marketing. Research must be done to tailor your advertisements to a select group of people. Let’s say you’re in the electronics business. About 150 of your clients and people who give feedback either in-store or online are people who regularly buy surround sound speakers. Shouldn’t your message to them specifically target their interest in surround sound speakers? Finding a group of people who show interest in a particular product makes it easy to craft a direct mail or email advertisement that peaks interest and inspires people to become either first-time or repeat customers.

The next time you are trying to figure out how to reach more people and increase your bottom line, consider the proven effective strategies of direct marketing. Putting time and effort into the proper research to craft an advertisement that is compelling will surely pay off in the long run and significantly increase your profit margin.

Marketing Plan: Why All Small Businesses Need A Solid Plan!

“Good plans shape good decisions. That’s why good planning helps to make elusive dreams come true.”Lester R. Bittel

Recently, I offered a marketing plan review as a door prize for a local business group. When I approached the winner to exchange information, she whispered that she didn’t have a written one; she had it stored in her head. She then asked it a marketing plan was even necessary.

Should Your Small Business Have A Marketing Plan?

Absolutely! In fact, as a small business consultant, I’ve encountered numerous clients who repeatedly make the same mistake… failing to have a plan ‘business or marketing’ in place.

In a recent survey, I asked 200 respondents, ‘of the many issues facing their businesses, what common road blocks hindered their business growth.’ An overwhelming 32% said ‘No Marketing Plan’ was a potential reason for lack of sales and growth.

Why Marketing Plan?

Well, a marketing plan is a road map that details a route you should take to successfully promote and expand your business. It is critical to the success of a business, in fact, to all businesses! If a small business wants to achieve its potential, a marketing plan must be implemented!

Marketing is more than just ordering business cards or creating a flyer, it’s how you communicate with your current and potential clients. It is important to get your name out in the business community and differentiate your products and services from that of your competitor. If you don’t market your products or services, how will people know that you are a serious business owner or worse, in business? With a marketing plan, you will have a game plan in place.

A marketing plan is an integral and valuable tool for determining success of your business and the overall direction that your product or service should be taking. It should:

  • Clarify the impact and results of past marketing decisions.
  • Elucidate the external market that a company is competing.
  • Include deadlines for meeting those targets.
  • Prepare a budget for all marketing activities.
  • Set objectives and provide path for future marketing efforts.
  • Require accountability and measures for all activities.

6 Key Components of a Marketing Plan

Market Research

Gather information about your target market to include competition, business and industry environment.

When researching, answer the following questions:

  1. Who are your customers?
  2. What do they want or need?
  3. What is important to them?
  4. Who are your competitors? What are their strengths and weaknesses?
  5. What is your businesses environment, locally, regionally, and nationally?
  6. Is your industry doing well?

Target Market

Potential customers who have issues that or problems which your products or services can fulfill. Generally, people in this segment possess common characteristics and a relatively high tendency to purchase a particular product or service. Included in a target market are demographic, geographic and psychographic characteristics.

Executive Summary

A brief summary which includes the main points of the plan; generally shared with people you approach with your plan, such as investors or lenders who may want to read a synthesized version to determine if they are interested in it before taking the time to read it in depth.

Situation Analysis

The evaluation of operations to determine the reasons for the gap between what was or is expected, and what has happened or will happen.

SWOT Analysis

A formal outline to identify and frame a company’s’ growth opportunities; SWOT is an acronym for an organization’s internal Strengths and Weaknesses and external Opportunities and Threats.

Marketing Strategy

A process that allows a company’s to concentrate its limited resources on the greatest opportunities to increase sales and achieve a sustainable competitive advantage.

Budget

Estimates tied to specific allocation of revenues. A budget is required to have a successful marketing plan.

  • Yearly marketing budget
  • Expected return after investment
  • Breakdown of expected expenditures

In conclusion, as you can see, a marketing plan serves as your roadmap. It is critical for the success of your business. If writing a marketing plan seems a little intimidating, click here for FREE tools to help you.